Hot Polka Dot
20Apr/10

Double Chocolate Banana “Bread”.

Some of you might recall I mentioned my aversion to bread. I'm not afraid of eating it. Not at all. Or inhaling it's sweet, freshly baked smell.

It's the yeast part I'm actually nervous about. I've never used yeast. Not once. It's a little embarrassing really. Here I am out here on the interwebs claiming to be a baker of sorts and I have yet to tackle the most basic forms of baking. Bread is ancient. It's tried, tested and trusted all over the world. It's intimidating.

Something about the yeast. How you have to add it to warm water and let it...grow? Weird. Then I must knead this dough for...how long? No thanks. Then there's this whole rising part. I mean, what will I do when faced with the inevitability of a hunk of dense, dark, heavy, short, rebellious, un-risen bread? I'll cry, that's what. I'm being a big baby, I know. I just hate failure. And failure in the kitchen just seems to hurt that much more.

I know it's simple. I know it's tasty. Why haven't I made some? Bread. Mysterious bread. You know what the funny part is? I know that once I start making bread, once I leap over that baking hurdle and dive into the fantastic world of bread making, I know I'm going to love it. I won't be able to get enough of it. I'll eat bread morning, noon and night. Foccacia toast for breakfast, french bread paninis for lunch, pulled pork on pretzel rolls for dinner and cinnamon buns for dessert. Sounds pretty good right?

I'll make some. Soon...ish.

In the mean time I made Double Chocolate Banana “Bread”. I always thought It was odd to call it bread when really it's just cake in loaf form. I just like the irresistible alliteration of it. Banana Cake just sounds silly. This is practice for the big day I suppose. I can pretend it's bread, but at least I don't have to pretend it's delicious.











Double Chocolate Banana Bread

Source: My own imagination.

1 1/2 cup flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp powder
1/4 cup cocoa powder
3 large bananas, mashed
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 egg, slightly beaten
1/3 cup unsalted butter, melted
1 cup chocolate chips









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Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and place a rack in the middle. Butter and flour a 9 inch loaf pan then set it aside.

Whisk together the flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder and cocoa powder in a small bowl.

In a larger bowl mash the bananas with a fork. Add the sugar, slightly beaten egg and melted butter then combine.

Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and stir it all with the fork until it's just moistened then lightly mix in the chocolate chips.

Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan and smooth out the top with a spatula. Bake it for 30 – 40 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean. Let it cool in the pan for about 5 – 10 minutes before flipping it out upside down on a plate then flip it again so it right side up on a cooling rack. Slice and enjoy!








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Comments (8) Trackbacks (1)
  1. I agree, yeast is a bit frightening….the part I hate is where the recipe will say to add yeast to water that is a certain temperature. Ummmm…..I don’t own a water thermometer. I only own meat, candy, and people thermometers. Very confusing.

  2. what a great loaf..banana and chocolate are a great combo

    sweetlife

  3. Don’t worry about using yeast – it is no where near as difficult as it sounds. Once you start using it, it will open a whole new world of baking some really wonderful food – not just bread, but also various sweet cakes and savory pies. I actually love using yeast – it gives the dough certain texture that you cannot achieve without it. Having said that, I only use fresh yeast – I have never learned to use dry powdered yeast (it somehow never works the way I expect). Once you start using yeast, I recommend you trying to make bread with rosemary and olive oil – it is delicious!

  4. Lol ya Kristan all I have is a meat thermometer and I use it for most things besides candy. I know that you need a candy thermometer for that since it has to be more precise. As long as it tells me the temperature I’m good to go.

    Eve, my mother tells me the same thing about using fresh yeast. I think she’d be personally offended if I used instant yeast. :)

  5. I learned to bake yeast bread a few months ago (it’s what got me on my cooking kick and my blog) and I will never go back. Yeah, at first it was confusing and I had issues with rising. I was also impatient. I also made so much bread that first month that my family had to tell me to find someone else to pawn it off on. But it no longer phases me and I’ve started to be able to mess with ingredients and make my own recipes.

    And with respect to water & yeast… First, if you’re using dry yeast, you don’t have to let it sit there and get fizzy. You just stir your yeast into the water. It doesn’t go bad for a very very long time, as opposed to fresh yeast. And Kristan up there shouldn’t be concerned with water temperature. If you are using dry active yeast, you need water that is between 100F and 110F. Use warm tap water at a temperature you would wash a baby or your dog. Warm, but not scalding. If it is a little cooler, your bread will be fine. It just may take a little longer to rise. In fact, I’d say that it is better for your water to be on the cooler side if you are unsure. Rapid Rise yeast is a little more fickle with temperature, so I say just use active dry or instant.

    When you decide to take up the task, feel free to ask me any questions. I’m not embarrassed to share my failures and the way I fixed them.

  6. Thanks for the advice Baking Barrister! I may take you up on that offer in the near future. :)

  7. Looks like a great loaf of bread! Yeah I totally had the same fear of using yeast a few years back, but once you start using it you get the hang of what causes a disaster and what works. I have had many duds, and still do occasionally. My suggestion would be to use good yeast like Red Star and there are many others, there are also yeasts that don’t require the warm water, but I haven’t had much luck with those. Good luck

  8. I’ve been baking for many, many years and I too consider myself a baker, but I kept away from yeast till two days ago. I actually made European pastries using yeast and it wasn’t that bad,lol. Now I just need to practice more.


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